Boil Advisory, by Jerry Pierce

191
   Our dog Sugar acquired a taste for Evian bottled water during the city’s recent boil order emergency, and we are having a hard time getting her back on regular tap water.
Regina was out of town when concerns surfaced about possible contamination of the city’s water supply, so I had to deal with the fallout from the boil advisory.
Instead of taking time to boil some tap water, I just filled Sugar’s water bowl with Evian.  That’s the spring water from the French Alps with the image of snow-covered mountains on the bottles.
To be honest, Evian is a little too swanky not just for Sugar but also for Regina and me.  It’s pricier than the bottled water that we drink most of the time.
Our every-day water supply is the purified stuff from municipal water systems in some big cities.  They just fill bottles from their taps and sell it to folks who don’t want to drink their own tap water.
Most of that processed water comes in those flimsy plastic bottles that crinkle and spurt the contents out the top if you squeeze them a little too hard.   Evian bottles are thicker and sturdier.
Sort of like Sugar, I inadvertently took a liking to the Evian brand despite its ritzy reputation and the sticker shock.  It happened when Steel Magnolias was being filmed here.
The movie folks had Evian shipped in by the truckloads for cast and crew members.  There were wood pallets loaded with cases of Evian when they finished the movie and left town.
They gave countless cases of it to several of us who had been liaisons between the movie and the community.  It was good and it was free, so I got hooked like Sugar did on premium bottled water.
Regina knows I prefer Evian over that purified water in the fragile bottles, so she gets me some once in a while when the big discount stores have it on sale.
Considering the kind of water I grew up drinking in Springhill, it surprises me some to have become so picky and selective about bottled water.
There were days when my mother would have to put off her clothes-washing because the water was “rusty,” as she would say.  It did have kind of a brownish-gold rust color to it.
She wouldn’t wash clothes in it, but that didn’t keep us from drinking it or stop her from cooking with it.  I don’t remember ever getting any boil orders in those days.
My dad, who would turn over in his grave if he could see people spending their hard-earned money on bottled water, never worried much about water quality.
We iced down tap water in gallon pickle jars for our fishing trips on the mill ponds, and there were usually some particles of rust or some other residue floating around in it.
If it was especially hot and we emptied the pickle jar, we would just lean over the side of the boat, cup our hands and drink some of the mill pond water.
Not that Springhill folks didn’t have access in those days to some good water.  The town, after all, was named for the cold, clean water that poured from its many springs into deep, clear pools.
The label on a bottle of water I got at a drug store not long ago said the source of the water was the natural springs in Springhill.  But that was not the water that flowed through our faucets and hydrants when I lived there.
I hoped to get Sugar weaned off Evian before Regina got back home and even started putting tap water in an Evian bottle before pouring it into her bowl.
But she is apparently smarter than the average scruffy, mixed breed rescue dog.  She sniffs the water, drinks it if its Evian and walks away if it’s not.
It all started with the boil order.  From now on when my water bill comes, I plan to enclose with my payment an invoice to the mayor for Sugar’s Evian water.
Reflections                   Boil Advisory             For:  Sunday, July 15
Our dog Sugar acquired a taste for Evian bottled water during the city’s recent boil order emergency, and we are having a hard time getting her back on regular tap water.
Regina was out of town when concerns surfaced about possible contamination of the city’s water supply, so I had to deal with the fallout from the boil advisory.
Instead of taking time to boil some tap water, I just filled Sugar’s water bowl with Evian.  That’s the spring water from the French Alps with the image of snow-covered mountains on the bottles.
To be honest, Evian is a little too swanky not just for Sugar but also for Regina and me.  It’s pricier than the bottled water that we drink most of the time.
Our every-day water supply is the purified stuff from municipal water systems in some big cities.  They just fill bottles from their taps and sell it to folks who don’t want to drink their own tap water.
Most of that processed water comes in those flimsy plastic bottles that crinkle and spurt the contents out the top if you squeeze them a little too hard.   Evian bottles are thicker and sturdier.
Sort of like Sugar, I inadvertently took a liking to the Evian brand despite its ritzy reputation and the sticker shock.  It happened when Steel Magnolias was being filmed here.
The movie folks had Evian shipped in by the truckloads for cast and crew members.  There were wood pallets loaded with cases of Evian when they finished the movie and left town.
They gave countless cases of it to several of us who had been liaisons between the movie and the community.  It was good and it was free, so I got hooked like Sugar did on premium bottled water.
Regina knows I prefer Evian over that purified water in the fragile bottles, so she gets me some once in a while when the big discount stores have it on sale.
Considering the kind of water I grew up drinking in Springhill, it surprises me some to have become so picky and selective about bottled water.
There were days when my mother would have to put off her clothes-washing because the water was “rusty,” as she would say.  It did have kind of a brownish-gold rust color to it.
She wouldn’t wash clothes in it, but that didn’t keep us from drinking it or stop her from cooking with it.  I don’t remember ever getting any boil orders in those days.
My dad, who would turn over in his grave if he could see people spending their hard-earned money on bottled water, never worried much about water quality.
We iced down tap water in gallon pickle jars for our fishing trips on the mill ponds, and there were usually some particles of rust or some other residue floating around in it.
If it was especially hot and we emptied the pickle jar, we would just lean over the side of the boat, cup our hands and drink some of the mill pond water.
Not that Springhill folks didn’t have access in those days to some good water.  The town, after all, was named for the cold, clean water that poured from its many springs into deep, clear pools.
The label on a bottle of water I got at a drug store not long ago said the source of the water was the natural springs in Springhill.  But that was not the water that flowed through our faucets and hydrants when I lived there.
I hoped to get Sugar weaned off Evian before Regina got back home and even started putting tap water in an Evian bottle before pouring it into her bowl.
But she is apparently smarter than the average scruffy, mixed breed rescue dog.  She sniffs the water, drinks it if its Evian and walks away if it’s not.
It all started with the boil order.  From now on when my water bill comes, I plan to enclose with my payment an invoice to the mayor for Sugar’s Evian water.
 Reflections                   Boil Advisory             For:  Sunday, July 15
Our dog Sugar acquired a taste for Evian bottled water during the city’s recent boil order emergency, and we are having a hard time getting her back on regular tap water.
Regina was out of town when concerns surfaced about possible contamination of the city’s water supply, so I had to deal with the fallout from the boil advisory.
Instead of taking time to boil some tap water, I just filled Sugar’s water bowl with Evian.  That’s the spring water from the French Alps with the image of snow-covered mountains on the bottles.
To be honest, Evian is a little too swanky not just for Sugar but also for Regina and me.  It’s pricier than the bottled water that we drink most of the time.
Our every-day water supply is the purified stuff from municipal water systems in some big cities.  They just fill bottles from their taps and sell it to folks who don’t want to drink their own tap water.
Most of that processed water comes in those flimsy plastic bottles that crinkle and spurt the contents out the top if you squeeze them a little too hard.   Evian bottles are thicker and sturdier.
Sort of like Sugar, I inadvertently took a liking to the Evian brand despite its ritzy reputation and the sticker shock.  It happened when Steel Magnolias was being filmed here.
The movie folks had Evian shipped in by the truckloads for cast and crew members.  There were wood pallets loaded with cases of Evian when they finished the movie and left town.
They gave countless cases of it to several of us who had been liaisons between the movie and the community.  It was good and it was free, so I got hooked like Sugar did on premium bottled water.
Regina knows I prefer Evian over that purified water in the fragile bottles, so she gets me some once in a while when the big discount stores have it on sale.
Considering the kind of water I grew up drinking in Springhill, it surprises me some to have become so picky and selective about bottled water.
There were days when my mother would have to put off her clothes-washing because the water was “rusty,” as she would say.  It did have kind of a brownish-gold rust color to it.
She wouldn’t wash clothes in it, but that didn’t keep us from drinking it or stop her from cooking with it.  I don’t remember ever getting any boil orders in those days.
My dad, who would turn over in his grave if he could see people spending their hard-earned money on bottled water, never worried much about water quality.
We iced down tap water in gallon pickle jars for our fishing trips on the mill ponds, and there were usually some particles of rust or some other residue floating around in it.
If it was especially hot and we emptied the pickle jar, we would just lean over the side of the boat, cup our hands and drink some of the mill pond water.
Not that Springhill folks didn’t have access in those days to some good water.  The town, after all, was named for the cold, clean water that poured from its many springs into deep, clear pools.
The label on a bottle of water I got at a drug store not long ago said the source of the water was the natural springs in Springhill.  But that was not the water that flowed through our faucets and hydrants when I lived there.
I hoped to get Sugar weaned off Evian before Regina got back home and even started putting tap water in an Evian bottle before pouring it into her bowl.
But she is apparently smarter than the average scruffy, mixed breed rescue dog.  She sniffs the water, drinks it if its Evian and walks away if it’s not.
It all started with the boil order.  From now on when my water bill comes, I plan to enclose with my payment an invoice to the mayor for Sugar’s Evian water.
 AFFIDAVIT OF PUBLIReflections                   Boil Advisory             For:  Sunday, July 15
Our dog Sugar acquired a taste for Evian bottled water during the city’s recent boil order emergency, and we are having a hard time getting her back on regular tap water.
Regina was out of town when concerns surfaced about possible contamination of the city’s water supply, so I had to deal with the fallout from the boil advisory.
Instead of taking time to boil some tap water, I just filled Sugar’s water bowl with Evian.  That’s the spring water from the French Alps with the image of snow-covered mountains on the bottles.
To be honest, Evian is a little too swanky not just for Sugar but also for Regina and me.  It’s pricier than the bottled water that we drink most of the time.
Our every-day water supply is the purified stuff from municipal water systems in some big cities.  They just fill bottles from their taps and sell it to folks who don’t want to drink their own tap water.
Most of that processed water comes in those flimsy plastic bottles that crinkle and spurt the contents out the top if you squeeze them a little too hard.   Evian bottles are thicker and sturdier.
Sort of like Sugar, I inadvertently took a liking to the Evian brand despite its ritzy reputation and the sticker shock.  It happened when Steel Magnolias was being filmed here.
The movie folks had Evian shipped in by the truckloads for cast and crew members.  There were wood pallets loaded with cases of Evian when they finished the movie and left town.
They gave countless cases of it to several of us who had been liaisons between the movie and the community.  It was good and it was free, so I got hooked like Sugar did on premium bottled water.
Regina knows I prefer Evian over that purified water in the fragile bottles, so she gets me some once in a while when the big discount stores have it on sale.
Considering the kind of water I grew up drinking in Springhill, it surprises me some to have become so picky and selective about bottled water.
There were days when my mother would have to put off her clothes-washing because the water was “rusty,” as she would say.  It did have kind of a brownish-gold rust color to it.
She wouldn’t wash clothes in it, but that didn’t keep us from drinking it or stop her from cooking with it.  I don’t remember ever getting any boil orders in those days.
My dad, who would turn over in his grave if he could see people spending their hard-earned money on bottled water, never worried much about water quality.
We iced down tap water in gallon pickle jars for our fishing trips on the mill ponds, and there were usually some particles of rust or some other residue floating around in it.
If it was especially hot and we emptied the pickle jar, we would just lean over the side of the boat, cup our hands and drink some of the mill pond water.
Not that Springhill folks didn’t have access in those days to some good water.  The town, after all, was named for the cold, clean water that poured from its many springs into deep, clear pools.
The label on a bottle of water I got at a drug store not long ago said the source of the water was the natural springs in Springhill.  But that was not the water that flowed through our faucets and hydrants when I lived there.
I hoped to get Sugar weaned off Evian before Regina got back home and even started putting tap water in an Evian bottle before pouring it into her bowl.
But she is apparently smarter than the average scruffy, mixed breed rescue dog.  She sniffs the water, drinks it if its Evian and walks away if it’s not.
It all started with the boil order.  From now on when my water bill comes, I plan to enclose with my payment an invoice to the mayor for Sugar’s Evian water.