Locals present for ‘Clementine Hunter’s World’ screening in Washington, D.C

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The screening of “Clementine Hunter’s World” was followed by a panel discussion led by Tuliza Fleming, curator of American Art at the National Museum of African American History and Culture. From left are Art Shiver, producer of “Clementine Hunter’s World,” screened at the event; Tom Whitehead; Molly Baker, former Property Manager at Melrose Plantation and now with the HOPE team at the National Trust for Historic Preservation; Henry Price, supervisor of Art (K-12) for Caddo Parish Public Schools; and moderator Fleming. 

The film, “Clementine Hunter’s World,” was screened Sunday afternoon at  the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture at The Smithsonian in Washington D.C., which also is showcasing the exhibition “Clementine Hunter: Life on Melrose Plantation.” According to the “Clementine Hunter’s World” website, the film is  a short documentary on the life and work of self-taught, African American artist Clementine Hunter.

Written and directed by  Art Shiver, the film combines vintage photographs with Hunter’s images to bring her story to life. “This is the first film to take the viewers on a cinematic tour of the famed African House murals. Each panel is examined in detail for the first time on film. “Just as the civil rights protests were beginning to jolt America, self-taught African American artist, Clementine Hunter quietly painted a visual diary of plantation life in Melrose. In a community where history was an oral tradition, written documents were mostly of the white plantation owners. Hunter’s vast collection of painted memories shed new light on the untold stories of African American workers. With each creation, she revealed colorful tales of mid-century plantation life in the Cane River Country.

This panel of Clementine Hunter’s work is in the National Museum of African American History & Culture at The Smithsonian in Washington D.C.
Seamless Gutters

“This is the story of an uneducated African American house servant who became a world-famous artist. Though she never learned to read or write, Clementine Hunter painted thousands of images immortalizing her experiences living in the rural South. This is Clementine Hunter’s World.” The film, “Clementine Hunter’s World,” was screened Sunday afternoon at  the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture at The Smithsonian in Washington D.C., which also is showcasing the exhibition “Clementine Hunter: Life on Melrose Plantation.” According to the “Clementine Hunter’s World” website, the film is  a short documentary on the life and work of self-taught, African American artist Clementine Hunter. Written and directed by  Art Shiver, the film combines vintage photographs with Hunter’s images to bring her story to life.

“This is the first film to take the viewers on a cinematic tour of the famed African House murals. Each panel is examined in detail for the first time on film. “Just as the civil rights protests were beginning to jolt America, self-taught African American artist, Clementine Hunter quietly painted a visual diary of plantation life in Melrose. In a community where history was an oral tradition, written documents were mostly of the white plantation owners. Hunter’s vast collection of painted memories shed new light on the untold stories of African American workers. With each creation, she revealed colorful tales of mid-century plantation life in the Cane River Country. “This is the story of an uneducated African American house servant who became a world-famous artist. Though she never learned to read or write, Clementine Hunter painted thousands of images immortalizing her experiences living in the rural South. This is Clementine Hunter’s World.”