Battle of Pleasant Hill Re-enactment and Festival Committee invited to Capitol

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On front row from left are Battle of Pleasant Hill committee members Secretary Dawne Smith, Site Coordinator and historical fashion expert Susan Davis, Miss Teen Battle of Pleasant Hill Autumn Palmer, Teen Miss Battle of Pleasant Hill Annabelle Wagley, President Katelyn Calhoun, Site Management Corey Calhoun and Battle Coordinator, Colonel and Commander of the Trans Mississippi Volunteer Battalion Gary Stephens. On back row are Communications Coordinator Sean Davis, Thomas Webb and Vice President Austin Ladner. Not pictured are Treasurer Holly Ladner, Coordinator for Fundraisers and Merchandise Sales Karen Hardee, Pageant Director and Queens Coordinator Cally Kinningsworth and Commandant Donald Kimbell.

Members of the Battle of Pleasant Hill Re-enactment and Festival were recognized at the Capitol by the House of Representatives May 27. They were invited by Representative Rodney Schamerhorn. Representative Larry Bagley was also there to greet the group.

The Battle of Pleasant Hill Re-enactment and Festival commemorates the April 9, 1864 Civil War battle that occurred in Pleasant Hill as part of the Red River Campaign. This is one of the longest running and largest living history events in Louisiana. The organization celebrated their 42nd event in April of 2021 and are already planning for future events.

From left are State Representative Rodney Schamerhorn, Miss Teen Battle of Pleasant Hill Autumn Palmer, Teen Miss Battle of Pleasant Hill Annabelle Wagley and State Representative Larry Bagley.
Natchitoches Wood

The Battle of Pleasant Hill strives to educate the public about the history of Pleasant Hill and its historic battle as well as preserve the site and its history for future generations. The group’s committee commemorates this battle to remember those who lived in the town of Pleasant Hill and survived this terrifying event and for those who fought and died on the sacred ground of the battlefield. They remember and honor them because they are people who mattered then, and who still matter now.

These goals are accomplished through the re-enactment and various other preservation projects such as the organization’s “Save the Dogtrot” Project. This is an ongoing historic building restoration of the Elam O’Pry house, known as the Dogtrot since it is a Dogtrot style home. The Elam-O’Pry house is the only reminding structure from the original town of Pleasant Hill and is the only “witness” still standing of the original battle that took place in 1864.